08
MAY
2018

Ontario College of Trades and Skills Ontario sign MOU on apprenticeship promotion

Toronto, ON (May 8, 2018) – The Ontario College of Trades (College) and Skills Ontario are working together to further raise awareness and attract people to careers in the skilled trades.

College CEO and registrar, George Gritziotis and Skills Ontario CEO, Ian Howcroft, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that focuses on enhancing outreach activities to promote careers in the skilled trades to key audiences including youth, parents, educators, government, labour, employers/sponsors and other stakeholders.

This MOU was introduced in part, due to concerns about Canada’s shortage of tradespeople which is expected to hit at least one million by 2020, and fueled by baby boomers retiring, according to recent research by Workopolis. According to a 2016 report by the Information and Communications Technology Council, Canada will also create an estimated 218,000 new technology jobs.

“Working in partnership built on shared tools, resources, and objectives this MOU will help direct our efforts to encourage more young people to pursue the skilled trades which can provide a rewarding and well-paying career,” said George Gritziotis, CEO and registrar, Ontario College of Trades. “We are committed to working collaboratively with Skills Ontario to build a broader coalition to promote the skilled trades in the province.”

“This MOU demonstrates a new commitment to skilled trades promotion in Ontario. I welcome this important initiative which guides and strengthens the existing relationship between the Ontario College of Trades and Skills Ontario. I look forward to continuing to build on our constructive cooperation in the interest of enhancing the skilled trades in the province,” said Ian Howcroft, CEO, Skills Ontario.

Combining the collective strengths of both organizations, this partnership focuses on engaging more employers—highlighting the business and economic value of their participation, and supporting trades education and apprenticeships. This collaboration will bring together resources from both organizations to build programs to inspire more educators and parents to incorporate skilled trades-related activities into curricula and in their discussions on the viability of careers in the skilled trades

Notably, the promise to work collaboratively with government is highlighted—encouraging continued support of apprenticeship modernization and improving pathways to greater completion rates and increased rates of graduation to journeyperson class.

For more information on the skilled trades in Ontario, go to www.collegeoftrades.ca and www.skillsontario.com.